PETER OAKMAN

The man who for more than 40 years has been the 'Rock' of so many Rock 'n' Roll stars sings the hits and tells his stories throughout these pages.

Peter Oakman was born on December 12th, 1943 in Cuffley, Hertfordshire, England to parents Albert and Francesca, the middle child of three sons. Tony (now deceased) had been born in 1939 and Michael in 1950. Peter's first public performance was in 1953 at a local talent competition, with Tony, in celebration of the ascension to the throne of Queen Elizabeth II. Peter played guitar and Tony played banjo.

On our Music page we have a selection of MP3 tracks which, we hope, will suit all tastes. There's "At The Hop”, "It's Late", "Sea Cruise", "Lady Miss Clawdy", "The Wanderer", "It’s Only Make Believe", "A Picture Of You", (well, we had to feature that one, didn't we?) "Whole Lotta Woman", "Boney Maroney" and a very rare track featuring The Spacemen skiffle group with Peter at the tender age of 13, in 1957, playing bass guitar. There are no prizes for guessing who did the original songs featured but I'm sure you will do a search on internet and have the knowledge on hand for the next time you do a quiz night!

Peter Oakman - Rock of the Stars

Almost 40 years ago it was Lonnie Donegan who first called me 'his Rock'. 'Rock Solid' as bass player, in reliability, in person - a rock always there for him. After that the name kind of stuck and was taken on by many other of the great artistes I have worked with throughout an enjoyable and rewarding career". That is how Peter Oakman became "The Rock" of the Stars.

Career highlights outside of music

During the seventies Peter set up a PR company. One of his clients was the actor Peter Ustinov who had been asked by Prince Charles to narrate his story "The Old Man Of Lochnagar". Peter recalls: "I had a meeting in London with Peter about 18 months before the release of the product to organise three days of his time so that I could arrange press, radio and TV interviews. "He was a wonderful man with a great sense of humour and he made my job so easy". This came about through Peter's good friend Anna McCorquodale who, at the time, was married to Ian McCorquodale who is the son of the novelist Barbara Cartland. Anna was also Princess Diana's stepsister-in-law. In 1976 Peter was also asked to promote the American bi-centenary, setting up interviews with visiting American artistes to Great Britain from all aspects of the arts. Outside of music Peter has worked for two Archbishops of Canterbury, but that's another story!

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